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20121201
20121231
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, i hope you have not given it away. >> not at all. >> ok. pat and bob had graciously let us use their space. as we are moving offices, i have come upon some newspapers. where are you, sharon? god bless sharon from alaska. [applause] for those of you who are not clapping, the reason people are clapping is because sharon kept jack kemp out of a lot of trouble. [applause] i think sharon packed away these newspapers from 1980 one and heard marco mentioned the economic recovery act of 1981. there is a story behind it. the kemp history has collected much of the story, but "the washington post" saved by sharon alaska -- i got incredibly distracted by all of the cool stuff. i come upon these stories. one is from july 25, 1981. about president reagan going on to the hill to pitch his bill. the next is from july 30, 1981. this feels kind of awkward. there are two stories here. both of them have dad's picture on the front. the second expands the story of how the legislation passed. some of you know the history better than me, but asked legislation is not always pretty. and this country whe
recuperating from his wounds at an army hospital in michigan. future majority leader bob dole, another young gi, who had been also wounded in the european theater, and he told senator inouye he wanted to go to law school and go to congress. bob dole was elected to congress one year after senator inouye. senator inouye always joked, "i went with the dole plan, and i beat him. " he has been a soft and powerful voice. although he was an unabashed progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vital presence in the senate, and in death, he will remain a legend. his last words on earth, "aloha," and it is with a heavy heart that we did him aloha, we love you, to a legend of the senate, daniel inouye. -- we bid him aloha. >> good morning. on behalf of the united states house of representatives, i extend condolences to his family, colleagues, and constituents. in late 1963, a young freshman senator stood under the splenda dome, as we do now, in vigil and in prayer. years on, daniel inouye could still remember how quiet this ever boisterous rotunda became when pre
carney. c-span2 will be covering that live. and now bob woodward on his latest book "price of politics." he spoke with "politico's" chief white house correspondent mike allen and failing to chief a compromise. this is part of a "politico" playbook discussion. it's about 25 minutes. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to "playbook breakfast." thank you for coming out so early. we're excited to have an amazing double-header today. we are going to talk to senator rubio who last night gave a big speech, one of the first formal speeches looking ahead to the future of the republican party. we are going to talk to senator rubio about that. first we have the amazing treat of bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations, is going to be joining us in just a second. first, welcome, all the people out in livestream land. we'll be taking your questions on #politicobreakfast. tweet us. welcome to c-span and to others. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year including the conventions an
from the progressive policy institute. we have senator bob packwood from oregon, former chairman of the senate finance committee, part of the 1986 negotiations. and the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have an hour to an hour and a half. if you hear something you want to weigh in on, don't wait for me. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this issue and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table and would like your thoughts. as you heard from chairman bachus. they need ideas to bridge this gap because we appear to be at a stale mate. i turn it over to john to get your thoughts knowing he has to leave and the center for american progress has come out with some ideas and john maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, i think following up on this morning's session, clearly to have a balanced approach we need
a stairway to heaven metaphor, and it did not work. when jimmy page and john paul jones and john bob burst onto the musical screen, the world never saw it coming. there was a singer with the me like a lion, a voice like a being she, guitar prodigy who let people's jobs on the floor, equally at home on the keyboards. a drummer who played the dislike depended on it. when they initially kept their distance, led supplicant proud america from opening court. we were ready for what should be called songs with a lot of light and shade. it has been set a generation of young people to buy teenage aids with a pair of headphones and is up when album and the generation of parents wondered what all that noise was about. even now, 32 years after his passing we all appreciate the fact that this that led legacy lives on. the last time the band performed together in 2007, perhaps the last time ever, more than 20 million fans applied for tickets. what they saw were no frills and theatrics, a few guys that could still make ladies we get these huddled together, following the music. these guys redefine the rock
to address this. [applause] >> wow. man. thank you, bob. i met him when i was 23 years old in wisconsin. i was introduced to him by my mentor, jack kemp. jimmy, your family, and you for caring on the torch. quick you close your eyes, you think you are listening to -- if you close your eyes, you think you are listening to jack kemp. it is something that is really a great honor to do this, to be here. back in this room like last year, and i want to say congratulations to marco rubio on receiving this well deserved honor. [applause] now, as you may know, marco is joining an elite group of past recipients for this award. [laughter] two of us so far. i will see you at the reunion dinner. [applause] [laughter] i am sure the press will not read too much into that one. [laughter] i want to thank you all for your kind hospitality. i want to thank you, jimmy, for holding this event. wherever i went, people would say, i work for jack kemp. that legacy lives on some much because of the connection to the family. there was something this legacy .as such reach hi it is an honor to be a part of this an. j
bob casey cheers this joint economic committee hearing. it is one hour and 45 minutes. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would d
into the hospital in michigan, one of the fellows i met there was bob dole. we became friends. when i asked him, what are your plans, and he, without hesitating said i am going to be a county clerk, after that i will run for the state house and when there is an opening in congress, that is where i will go. i said, that is a good idea. i went to law school and became assistant prosecutor. when the territory office became available, i ran for that office. when state could came along, i got to congress. -- statehood came along, i got to congress. >> you were in the territorial legislature before you got here. >> two terms in the house and a term in the senate. sparks then you came here as a member of the house. who did you come here with it? >> only one member. you mentioned senator dole and the fact you had been in the hospital with him in michigan. it is amazing how some of these relationships were formed before public service. the senator from wyoming house and senate and meeting him when he was a boy scout together. you have a relationship with bob dole. >> the other is phil. the hospital is n
"the "new york post" -- emilie, joe is it -- josephine, and anna were buried yesterday. bob is joining us from houston, texas, the democrats' line. caller: i would like to say that the assault rifle should be treated like the automobile -- you have to have a title to them and buy insurance and the higher the gun power is, the higher insurance, and when you sell it or do something with it, the title should be transferred and responsibility transferred to the person that owns it. in this way, we would have to go big organizations working, trying to come up with the right solution, the nra and the insurance industry. if you want to own something, you should be responsible for it. host: double for the call. from the new york times book section -- we are featuring the -- "the last line -- lion" interview this evening. gayle joins us from louisiana. democrats line. caller: independent line. host: it's as democrats, but go ahead. -- it says democrats, but go ahead. caller: on this assault weapons controversy, a couple of things -- what happened to those children was awful. what happened to th
and by the president. first of all, thank you, bob for that kind introduction. thanks for being so persist nt. i'm glad to have the chance now to come. in reflecting for my fair well address in the senate, i thought back to what motivated me to run for the united states senate. about 48 years ago i came to washington as a 16-year-old, sat in the gallery and watched a debate occur on civil rights. and i thought at the time some day i'd like to do that. i'd like to represent my state and i'd like to debate the great issues of the day. and after that trip i went home and i wrote on the back of an informal that i would run for the united states senate in 1986 or 1988 and i ran in 1986 and won what was considered to be the biggest political up senate north dakota history. so that is the power of a plan. and clearly our country now needs a plan. we need a fiscal plan. we need a plan that is going to bring us back from the brink because most economist tell us on our current course over the next several decades we will hit a debt that will be 230% of our gdp, clearly unsustainable. so we need a plan to get us
to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping off point for neutralizing all of these questions. so, you know, we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so, if you -- you know, a 10% shift in the latino votes moving 1 million to 1.3 million, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is, we don't really know yet. it's going to take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> yes. >> you know, geeky with you [laughter] a shift to a million voters, million and a half voters, and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share, and everybody would have said, "that was a pretty good night for a republican." now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask that -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row, getting everyone. >> it's interesting, because it doesn't -- it would have -- i'll leave it to the pundits
or have differences. but they did keep each other informed. bob dole replaced howard baker as a speaker. dole takes over baker as leader. but they kept baker informed. they just work together and kept each other in touch of what the other was great to do. they still opposed each other at times. they kept no secrets. >> i always like to talk about byrd and baker. they really did epitomize the great senate and the way things worked at that time. the first two chapters of my book are entitled "the grind" and "the natural." he was a most natural politician you could come across. if senators voted based on secret ballot, baker would have won. they had a remarkable capacity for doing that. there is one incident in my book where i describe senator byrd. it is such an unusual act, it he gets the vice president in the chair and by a script that byrd has written, start ruling them out of order in a way that is quite contrary to the way the senate work. there is a rebellion on the senate floor. everyone is going crazy and what robert byrd is doing even though they hate filibusters. one thing that
are pleased to have our distinguished colleagues chuck schumer from new york, bob mendez from new jersey and i believe senator gillibrand will be here shortly. the senators have been a strong partners in this rebuilding effort. it is a great privilege to work together. we are really strong team we share the value of a quick action and sufficient resources to get this job done. as i mentioned, we are in the largest transportation. in the country and it takes diligence and skill of our friends and colleagues. senator schumer. >> thank you, mr. chairman. first, thank you for this hearing but also for your great partnership. new york and new jersey were together as a bipartisan by-date delegation along with our colleagues from rest of the northeast to deal with this awful, awful devastation. it is good you are in so many important positions that will have a lot of say in how we deal with this and we're grateful for that as well as your leadership. thank you, ranking member, senator wicker. west hamilton beach was in my old congressional district. it is one of the few volunteer fire departments in
that will be up on the hill headed by bob adams. several others will be joining. thank you so much for joining us today. if you have any questions, please stick around and ask. thank you very much. >> thank you so much. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> up next on c-span, today's house debate on the fiscal cliff. then, chris van hollen. >> the senate's all -- the senate small business committee holds a hearing on the hurricanes and the response -- hurricane sandy response. live coverage at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span 3 and c- span.org. >> i wanted to explain how totalitarianism happens. we have seen the documents of cold war. roosevelt, stalin, churchill, truman. we know the main events from our point of view. -- point of view. what i wanted to do a show from a different angle, from the ground up. what did it feel like to be the people who were subjected to the system? one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region we used to call europe has been very differentiated. these countries longer have much in common with each other -- no longer have much in common with each other. . -- sunda
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14